Stand Out on LinkedIn with Rich Media

LinkedIn profiles can be so more than just a boring online version of your résumé.

Use LinkedIn profile like Coke, Ford and many others do: to promote themselves. Company websites and commercials contain customer testimonials, product demonstrations, and visual proof of their products. They use video, presentations and images to convey their message.

So can you! It just takes a little creativity…

What Media Can You Add?

LinkedIn now supports  images, video, audio, presentations and documents by certain providers listed here; others may work too. You have the choice to upload a file or use a URL if already published to the web.

These nifty media clips can be placed in various places in your profile. They can be part of your summary, incorporated into each position listed in your experience section, and in your education section. Just go to edit your profile and look for the little blue box. See image below.

LinkedIn Summary Ben Martin

What to Showcase?

Think about the problems or challenges of the audience you want to do business with. Does you company already have assets you can use, perhaps on YouTube  or perhaps they have material available on Slideshare. What value can you provide that differentiates you from the hundreds and thousands of other people who have the same job title as you?

LinkedIn is one of the first stops your client will make when they look you up. Why not go one step further and create you own original content. You can create a PowerPoint highlighting your knowledge or accomplishments and publish it to SlideShare. This is fairly simple to do. The most difficult part is figuring out what you will put into your PowerPoint presentation. Search around SlideShare and get ideas from other people who have created online content in your area of expertise. If you are interested in creating something a bit jazzier than PowerPoint, you may want to test Prezi.

Think of your profile as you window of credibility, what would you want someone to find if they were searching for you on the web?

Make your LinkedIn profile rock… with a media rich profile!

LinkedIn Profile Blueprint – Your Digital Brand in the Social Landscape

 

How to start building the perfect LinkedIn Profile:

2013 LinkedIn Profile Character Limits

Knowing the space with which you can work in your LinkedIn profile is key to helping you build your perfect social brand! Here are your character limits:

  • Headline – 120 characters to fill with keywords, answer the question, “What do you do and the outcome you will provide?”
  • Summary – 2,000  characters to tell the story or YOU with keywords and  accomplishments. How have you helped others and their results they achieved from you.
  • Experience/Position Title – 100 characters to sum up your official experience in a title, or something more creative with keywords
  • Experience/Position Description – 2,000 characters to use keywords to sum up your role and your one to three key accomplishments. Make sure to format this area to make sure it is easy to read!
  • Skills & Expertise – 61 characters for the 50 skills you can list
  • Status updates – 700 characters for an unlimited times per day, however, I recommend only one or two per day. And you can include a hyperlink if you need more room!
  • Groups – 50 groups is your limit, so pick them wisely to show others with whom you are keeping company!
  • Education/Degree – 100 characters to explain your degree to include relevant keyword phrases
  • Education/Activities & Societies – 500 characters to give an overview that can tie into your career
  • Education Description – 1,000 characters to offer an overview of what you studied and how it is relevant to your career
  • Additional Info/Interests – 1,000 characters to further explain your background and show how interesting you really are!
  • Honors & Awards – 1,000 characters to shine the spotlight on YOU! Even if you won a sales award, it’s a great accomplishment to list!
  • Videos and Content – You are now able to add videos or other content such as pdf’s or powerpoints under several sections – Summary, Experience and Education. So get adding!

I would love to know if you have a tip or trick with the way you use LinkedIn! If you do, please comment. You can also follow me on Twitter @Social_Ben

Credit for content: MarketingThink.Com

How should your Linkedin profile be written? 3rd or 1st Person? [The Results]

LinkedIn is one of the most powerful tools to demonstrate the value of YOU. I have always pondered what is the best way to convey your persona, should your writing style be in the third person “Ben always takes time to help” or the first person “I enjoy helping people”

To answered this I ran a poll on LinkedIn and I was delighted to have one hundred and seventy one people respond, here are the results

What were the demographics for each answer?

 

 

There were over 28 comments add here are some of the highlights:

Guy likes when an applicant can express themselves to Guy effectively and accurately.

I for one think that first person is the only way to go with both. To me, a CV or LinkedIn profile written in the third person reads like a film promotion

I think your LinkedIn profile should be written the same as a resume where you never use the word “I”

I think in case of 1st person, too much of “I” sounds arrogant.

1st is always the best in speaking or in writing terms.

3rd person implies arrogance or ignorance, both of which are an automatic turn-off

Unless you’re royalty, I think the 1st person reads better… makes one sound less pretentious

I think first person definitely, after all its all about you!

The first person unless you are a novelist!

 

To summarize the comments there seems to be two trains of thought. If you are using the platform to find your next job most are saying that a third person style is preferred. If you are using the platform to build relationships and demonstrate the value of YOU then first person wins hands down.

If you would like to read more of the comments please see the link below.

 

As the poll is now closed why not add your thoughts in the comments and keep this debate going! Thanks for reading

LinkedIn unveil new Profile layout

LinkedIn are rolling out further changes to their members over the next three months. These enhancements will help you to; tell your professional story easier with better visual elements, discover people and opportunities with greater insights and simpler ways to uncover common interests and engage with your network.

If you’d like to be one of the first ones to get the new Profile, you can sign up here: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/sample.

Meet the New LinkedIn Profile: A Better Way to Connect and Build Relationships

With this many changes so quickly is the platform at risk of losing members?

How to really used LinkedIn

LinkedIn is the proverbial dark horse of social media. We all know it’s there, but few of us use it to its full potential.

With just a little bit of effort you will see how the powerful social site can help you market yourself and your business far more than you imagined.

 LINKEDIN BOOT CAMP

LinkedIn is the proverbial dark horse of social media. We all know it’s there, but few of us use it to its full potential. This is a major mistake, especially when it comes to marketing yourself or your business. This Linkedin basic boot camp training will give you the tools necessary to use the site for all your business and personal needs.

When it comes to marketing yourself and your business. most people go straight to Facebook because of the sheer size of its user base. But demographically speaking, Linkedin has a leg up.

Linkedin has over 170 Million worldwide members {Up date – 200 million January 2013}  – 77% of Linkedin users are age 25 and above. – The average household income of a Linked users is $109,000

A RUN THROUGH THE LINKEDIN GAUNTLET

Linkedin is a network full of people who love, you guessed it, networking. They are the movers and shakers of their industries. These are the people you want to know about you and your business. Yes, Facebook ad Twitter can be powerful tools, but Linkedin users are know to be especially serious about their jobs, industry and social networks. With that in mind you must shift tactics when it comes to marketing yourself on Linkedin, as conversations and content are geared toward cultivating partnerships and advancing business than posting silly pictures from parties.

The following will get you in shape for the trials ahead.

CORE CONDITIONING – Complete your profile

Because your Linkedin profile generally ranks in the tops five google search results for your first and last name, your profile must be completely filled out. First impressions are everything, skimping on your profile will quickly decrease your value. Before moving on, take a moment to complete your profile.

AMMO – Customise your URL and websites

Neglecting this no-brainer move is a rookie mistake. Luckily it only takes a few moments to correct. When filling out your profile, customise your URL to reflect your name. Find this in the “edit profile” screen. If you have a blog or a web site to add, select “other” in the drop down menu and customise it. Don’t leave “Company Website” in there. The first web site is used by search engines. Call it what it is, allowing your page to rise in the rankings.

TONING – Spice up your image

Your profile now needs some pizazz, style, value. A bland lifeless profile turns of potential contacts, so let your personal creativity shine through. Use stories, video, recommendations etc., to quicly tell others who you are, what your about and how you can HELP THEM

STEALTH TATICS – optimise your search rankings

Many people use Linkedin to search for experts in their field, a new job, or connections. They search for keywords on Linkedin that you can rank highly in. Optimisation takes a bit of time and effort,, but it’s well worth it when you rank number one when someone searches for “social” or “management” for example. Incorporate key words into – Your headline / Your current work experience / Your past work experience / Your summary / Your specialties

HEAVY WEIGHT – Join groups

Linkedin groups give you the most mileage out of your experience. What ever your industry or business, join groups that will put you in touch with other experts in your industry. Try starting your own group and establish yourself as an expert in the field. Like a mini social network, these niche groups will foster discussion, spread your message and connect you with key people

SPECIAL WEAPONSAdd applications

There are a variety of applications that Linkedin has integrated into its site that make it easier for you to promote your work and improve your profile’s overall visitor experience. Browse through the applications and see which ones work best for you, your industry and your overall message.

All apps have been removed, we are yet to learn if they, or new ones will make a return. If you are still wanting a secret weapon that no one knows about – read this blog post “Smoke Signals

What other hints and tips have you got……

Personal Branding & Your Profile Pic

Many people think that personal branding is just for celebrities such as Justin Bieber or Stephen Fry, yet each and every one of us is a brand. Personal branding, by definition, is the process by which we market ourselves to others. Dan Schawbel is the author of Me 2.0: Build a Powerful Brand to Achieve Career Success, and owner of the award winning Personal Branding Blog and in this article discusses the personal branding process, so you can start to think about what face you want to show to the world and how you want to position yourself for success!

I spend a lot of my time coaching colleagues how to use social media for personal branding. One thing I always stress is the importance of first impressions and your profile picture.

Firstly to actually have an image of ‘yourself” goes a long way. We all like to know who we are talking to. Secondly using the same images across your platforms, so that we know we are speaking to the same person we met a ye olde twitter pub.

LinkingR have come up with a great gauge. Have a look and see if your avatar falls under one of these categories.

Category: Social Media | Comments Off on Personal Branding & Your Profile Pic

6 Steps to a More Marketable LinkedIn Profile

Overall, LinkedIn is the best social media platform for entrepreneurs, business owners, and professionals. Unfortunately, your LinkedIn profile may not be helping you to create those connections.

So let’s tune yours up with six simple steps:

Step 1. Revisit your goals. At its most basic level LinkedIn is about marketing: marketing your company or marketing yourself. But that focus probably got lost as you worked through the mechanics of completing your profile, and what started as a marketing effort turned into a resume completion task. Who you are isn’t as important as what you hope to accomplish, so think about your goals and convert your goals into keywords, because keywords are how people find you on LinkedIn.

But don’t just whip out the Google AdWords Keyword Tool and identify popular keywords. It’s useful but everyone uses it—and that means, for example, that every Web designer has shoehorned six- and seven-digit searches-per-month keywords like “build a website,” “website templates,” “designing a website,” and “webmaster” into their profile. It’s hard to stand out when you’re one of millions.

Go a step further and think about words that have meaning in your industry. Some are process-related; others are terms only used in your field; others might be names of equipment, products, software, or companies.

Use a keyword tool to find general terms that could attract a broader audience, and then dig deeper to target your niche by identifying keywords industry insiders might search for.

Then sense-check your keywords against your goals. If you’re a Web designer but you don’t provide training, the 7 million monthly Google searches for  “how to Web design” don’t matter.

Step 2. Layer in your keywords. The headline is a key factor in search results, so pick your most important keyword and make sure it appears in your headline. “Most important” doesn’t mean most searched, though; if you provide services to a highly targeted market the keyword in your headline should reflect that niche. Then work through the rest of your profile and replace some of the vague descriptions of skills, experience, and educational background with keywords. Your profile isn’t a term paper so don’t worry about a little repetition. A LinkedIn search scans for keywords, and once on the page, so do people.

Step 3. Strip out the clutter. If you’re the average person you changed jobs six or eight times before you reached age 30. That experience is only relevant when it relates to your current goals. Sift through your profile and weed out or streamline everything that doesn’t support your business or professional goals. If you’re currently a Web designer but were an accountant in a previous life, a comprehensive listing of your accounting background is distracting. Keep previous jobs in your work history, but limit each to job title, company, and a brief description of duties.

Step 4. Reintroduce your personality. Focusing on keywords and eliminating clutter is important, but in the process your individuality probably got lost. Now you can put it back and add a little enthusiasm and flair. Describing yourself as, “A process improvement consultant with a Six Sigma black belt,” is specific and targeted but also says nothing about you as a person—and doesn’t make me think, “Hey, she would be great to work with.”

Share why you love what you do in your profile. Share what you hope to accomplish. Describe companies you worked for or projects you completed. Share your best or worst experience. Keep your keywords in place, leave out what doesn’t support your goals, and then be yourself.

Keywords are important but are primarily just a way to help potential clients find you. No one hires keywords; they hire people.

Step 5. Take a hard look at your profile photo. Say someone follows you on Twitter. What’s the first thing you do? Check out their photo.

A photo is a little like a logo: On its own an awesome photo won’t win business, but a bad photo can definitely lose business.

Take a look at your current photo. Does it reflect who you are as a professional or does it reflect a hobby or outside interest? Does it look like a real estate agent’s headshot? A good photo flatters but doesn’t mislead. Eventually you’ll meet some of your customers in person and the inevitable disconnect between Photoshop and life will be jarring.

The goal is for your photo to reflect how you will look when you meet a customer, not how you looked at that killer party in Key West four years ago. The best profile photo isn’t necessarily your favorite photo. The best photo strikes a balance between professionalism and approachability, making you look good but also real.

Step 6. Get recommendations. Most of us can’t resist reading testimonials, even when we know those testimonials were probably solicited. Recommendations add color and depth to a LinkedIn profile, fleshing it out while avoiding any, “Oh jeez will this guy ever shut up about himself?” reactions. So ask for recommendations, and offer to provide recommendations before you’re asked.

The best way to build great connections is to always be the one who gives first.

Written by:

Jeff Haden learned much of what he knows about business and technology as he worked his way up in the manufacturing industry. Everything else he picks up from ghostwriting books for some of the smartest leaders he knows in business. @jeff_haden