Some Amazing LinkedIn Statistics

LinkedIn is one of the older social networks, surviving changes in technology, a tough demographic and a number of challengers along the way.

Here is a collection of interesting LinkedIn statistics, I thought you might like:

 

Statistics

Total number of LinkedIn users : 414 million (December ’15)

Number of new members per second: 2.3 (December ’15)

Number of users in the U.S.: 107 million (February ’16)

Unique visitors monthly: 100 million

Reach of LinkedIn: 200 countries and territories

Users outside of the U.S.: 70%

A professional photo on your profile makes you 14 times more likely to be viewed

Number of Linkedin member page views in Q4 2015: 3.7 Billion

Percentage of Male users: 56% (April ’14)

Percentage of Female users: 44% (April ’14)

Average Female network (U.S.): 101

Average user time spent on LinkedIn, monthly: 17 minutes

Average network size of a CEO: 930

Most over used word in LinkedIn profiles: Motivated (2014)

Users that have listed volunteer experience and causes: 10 million

Percentage of millennials (15-34) that use LinkedIn: 13%

Most used adjective used in Linkedin profiles: Responsible (’13), Creative (’12), Creative (’11)

Percentage of users that use LinkedIn at least once a day: 40%

LinkedIn’s percentage of sharing;

Global: 4% (’13)

N America: 5% (’13)

European: 2% (’13)

Asian: 1% (’13)

Users in UK: 20 millions (’16)

Users in Middle East: 10 million (’13)

Users in Asia: 61 million (’14)

Users in India: 31 million (’15)

Users in Australia: 6 million (’14)

Users in China: 10 million (’15)

Total long form posts on LinkedIn: 3 million (’15)

Total long form posts generated weekly: 130,000

Percentage of millionaires that use LinkedIn: 41% (’14)

Number of new connections made on LinkedIn in the UK 2015: 338.7 million

UK’s most represented industry: IT & Services (’16)

 

THE ROI OF SOCIAL SELLING: 5 DATA-DRIVEN OUTCOMES [INFOGRAPHIC]

The number of companies adopting Social Selling tactics is growing at a rapid rate. In fact, 62.9% of sales professionals report that Social Selling has become highly important for closing new deals. With such levels of adoption, the odds are high that either you or someone in your company are already using social channels to generate new revenue.

  • Buyers are already 57% through the purhcase process before sales professionals even speak to them. (Tweet This)
  • B2B organizations with tightly aligned marketing and sales achieved 24% faster revenue growth.(Tweet This)
  • Nearly 82% of buyers viewed between five to eight pieces of content from a winning vendor. (Tweet This)

From staying ahead of the competition to having more sales conversations, it’s undeniable the outcomes of Social Selling are evident. The infographic below shows the results that Social Selling is providing for companies of all sizes. Take a look!

social-selling-roi-infographic-#WESOE

Originally posted HERE

Listen “sales”, – There is no such thing as Social Selling!

No doubt this statement will bring the wrath of those “social selling” experts who have arisen over the last few years.
Don’t get me wrong – there is an incredibly powerful and commercially viable way of selling by leveraging social platforms, so let me explain.

First, I have a problem with the phrase “social selling”, mostly because it gives the impression that if you jump onto a social media platform, you will immediately be able to sell something. You won’t, at least not straight away. Using social platforms as an additional channel requires a strategy and one that teaches you to move from a day trader to a long term investor and builder of relationships. Yes you may be stumble upon an update that says ” I need to buy [your product], please contact me” but this is an exception and not the rule.

I also struggle with calling a sales person a “social seller”. Does this individual now only sell on social platforms, or more importantly are they a seller who not only utilises the traditional methods of selling but also blends in the benefits of using social tools to add tremendous value to those traditional face to face and telephone meetings?

Social selling does not work when detached from traditional sales methods. I want to share a strategy that will enhance those traditional methods and if done correctly may even negate the need for cold calling.

Now that I have sorted out the jargon lets look at how the commercially viable Social Sales teams do it. The rule is; create the social wrap.

Below is a suggested approach to blending your traditional methods of selling to enable or influence a purchase decision. Here are my five tips:

1: Build your brand.

2: Contribute to discussions.

3: Network

4: Provide relevance through thought leadership.

5: Practice the law of reciprocity, always.

Build your brand.

Building your brand is key and should be the foundation of any great sales person. You are researching your clients and gaining insights to their personality, interests and business synergies. It would be naive to think that your clients are not similarly checking you out. Right now the strongest platform to convey and market your expertise is LinkedIn, but that platform may not be the only one! Yes you are in marketing now, the marketing of your value and credibility.

Contribute to discussions

Participating in discussions is not just about listening to what your clients are saying or understanding what they are listening to. It is about adding your point of view to the conversation. Don’t sell your product; instead offer advice, strategies, coaching on things to consider, how to guides. Add value to a discussion, and in so doing become the authentic helper.

Network

Network and connect with people. Whether you met face to face or virtually, if you feel that reciprocal value can be achieved then invite them to be part of your network. Top tip; always personalise the invite, because not doing so shows a lack of professionalism and integrity.
Utilise your network. Earn social credit by connecting people to others that will add value and benefit them. By doing so you will increase your network in size.
Also use your network to influence, for instance Twitter is business networking on steroids. Surround your self with people you want to influence and provide them great content, relevance and value.

Provide relevance through thought leadership

You need to understand your network. Two important question you could ask yourself are: What types of information would they benefit from? Where and when are they seeking it? This will help you ascertain which platforms will benefit you the most. Consider blogging, as this will become a huge asset to your branding and thought leadership. As your network increases in size so will the diversity and quantity of your content.

Practice the law of reciprocity

Trading favours is a huge part of doing business in the social world. If you are already utilising your network and introducing people to others, you are already practicing this law. Read more at Wikipedia 

So those are my top five tips for creating a social wrap.
It is all about building a brand, sharing your expertise, offering your helpfulness and building relationships and influence that will enable you to sell more using social media.

Share your best practices and tips below on how you are using social tools to help sales. And don’t forget to practice the law of reciprocity now

Twitter search alerts via email with @Twilert

Twilert is back!

I have been using this tool to great effect, allowing me to receive email alerts, against any search words of my choice. Whether you want to  monitor what’s being said about you or your brand or keep an eye on your mentions, hashtags, defined search words on Twitter, this tool could be for you.

Now I said “its back”. This is because it stopped working. As you may have heard Twitter changed its API and effectively cut of access to many great applications out there. Twilert was one. The team have been tireless in rebuilding the tool and launched a revamped version. They also listened and responded to customer requests for enhancements. New features include:

– Realtime alerts
– Twitter search history stored for browsing & searching
– Excluding users from results
– Better Geo searches
– RSS, JSON feeds
– No ads

The new platform is ready to use here: http://www.twilert.com/

Unfortunately given the changes Twilert are unable to offer a completely free service. They do still offer a basic free plan but in order to pay for the hosting and deliver the features customers asked for they are charging a small subscription fee.

Twilert_Ben_Martin

LinkedIn – Harness the Power – Reap the Rewards

LinkedIn is great for Business, or I should say SMART Business & SMART Networking

I am NOT a LinkedIn expert, but I do know how to make it work for me. Do you?

We are both equal in exposure and linking possibilities yet 96.5% of my LinkedIn connections are the result of people wanting to connect with me.

I do not accept everyone. But I do click on everyone’s profile before connection. Many are impressive. Most are average or less. Some are down right bad.emptyshop

How’s yours? A good friend of mine, James Potter better know as the @thelinkedinman has a short quiz you can take in two minutes, I suggest you do. Here is the link.
How many connections do you have? How are you communicating with your connections? How are your connections helping your sales or your career?

Your LinkedIn profile is just one, but perhaps the most important, social presence you have. You control exactly what it is. When others search for you on Google, LinkedIn is one of the first links they click on. You have a one time chance to make a positive impact, both personally and for business.

The Good: When I realised the business significance of LinkedIn, I immediately sought professional help to help me with the keywords, layout, and what to include on my profile page. So should you.

It must be working. In the three years since, my network has grown substantially, people wanting to connect with me, be part of my network, be my customer. Huge opportunity. At an acquisition cost of ZERO.

The Reality: I receive requests to link and I also get messages. Some are very nice, some are self-serving, some are insincere, and some are stupid (very stupid). And ALL messages are a reflection of the person sending them. That would be you.

Here are some THINGS about LinkedIn to make you think, re-think, and act:

• Your picture is NOT an option. Show a professional, but approachable, image. Be proud of who you are.
• Have a LinkedIn profile that gives me insight, not just history. Not just what you’ve done, but also who you are. Your profile is your pathway to connection.
DANGER: DO NOT USE stock LinkedIn messages. It shows your laziness, lack of creativity, and overall lack of professionalism. Standard LinkedIn messages need to be replaced with your own. EVERY TIME.
• Tell me WHY I should connect. (Where’s the value? Its reciprocal you know)
• If you’re looking for leads, use the keyword feature (rather than the job title option) in the “advanced search” link to the right of the search box. It’s free, and you’ll find hundreds of people in your industry or in your backyard that you never knew existed.
• If you’re asking me (or people) to join your group, TELL ME WHY I SHOULD.
• Allocate 30-60 minutes a day to utilize this vital business social media asset.

LinkedIn is the business social media site of today AND tomorrow. Harness its power, do not abuse its options, and you will reap its rewards.

By the way, If you’re hoping for an endorsement or a recommendation on LinkedIn, or anywhere – EARN IT!

Do you have examples of good or bad messages, drop some examples below (delete names for courtesy!)

Recruiting With Social Media — 35 Tips for LinkedIn, Twitter & Facebook

The thing I love about other people’s tips is that you invariably uncover ideas you’re not already implementing yourself. That’s why I wanted to share this new infographic with you. Whilst not agreeing with every single tip, the vast majority resonate as things I’ve seen successful social media recruiters incorporating into their social media strategies.
I was certainly intrigued to see that tweets with links front-loaded in the tweet outperform others. One to experiment with in the recruiting space perhaps? Whilst the suggestion to seed your blog posts in LinkedIn groups is one I would suggest should be done sparingly. Certainly this can drive relevant candidate traffic for recruiters, but it’s a fine line between being helpful and spammy in a LinkedIn group (and definitely avoid placing job advert links in the main discussion area of LinkedIn groups – that’s what the “jobs” tab is there for in each group, but often I see desperate recruiters cluttering up the discussion boards with misplaced adverts).
How about you? Which of these tips resonate as things that have worked for you? What other ideas would you add to the mix? Please feel free to comment below…