The End of Television as we know it

The milestones of televison have been inspiring, going back to 1831 when Michael Faraday discovered electromagnetic induction. Television came of age in the 1950’s with popular shows like I Love Lucy, the 1954 World Soccer Championships. By the late 1960s and early 1970 colour television had become widely adopted and then the beloved remote control.

For generations the TV audience happily embraced scheduled programming. For the industry, making a  connection with the consumer was pretty straight forward, one-to-many experience… until recently.

Audiences today have some many media choices and are becoming increasling fragmented, splicing their time amongst the myriad of channels and platforms. Many consumers have migrated to more specialised, niche content via cable and multichannel offerings. Now with the growing availability of on demand, self programming and search features these niche users are moving to individualised viewing.

The are two market drivers that will drive evolution:
– Openness of access channels
– Levels of consumers involvement with media

There will be huge movement of these over the next five to seven years – but not uniformly. It will be marked with consumer bimodality, a coexistence of two types of users with disparate channel requirements. One segment remainly largely passive in the living room, whilst the other will force radical change in business models. The search for anytime anywhere content, leading us to a world of platform agnostic content, fluid mobility and the end of traditional concepts.

This is the beginning of “the end of TV as we know it”

Which category of user are you?

What Social Consumers Want From Brands (And What They Actually Get From Marketers) [INFOGRAPHIC]

Did you know that while more than three-quarters (76 percent) of marketers feel that they know what their consumers want, only about one-third (34 percent) have actually asked?

This divide, coined as the perception gap by industry analyst Brian Solis, naturally presents a problem for brands looking to maximize user engagement and conversion rates on platforms such as Twitter and Facebook. For optimum results, marketers need to put their egos to one side and reach out directly to their audience – or suffer the consequences.

Last fall, research from the Pivot Conference, set to take place this year between October 15-16 in New York, revealed a clearer picture of the disconnect between what consumers want and what they actually receive from brands they follow within social channels.

What Consumers Want From Social Brands

  • Deals and promotions (83 percent)
  • Rewards programs (70 percent)
  • Exclusive content (58 percent)
  • Feedback on new products (55 percent)

What Marketers Think Consumers Want From Social Brands

  • Insights for buying decisions (59 percent)
  • Customer service (58 percent)
  • Feedback on new products (53 percent)
  • Deals and promotions (53 percent)

Given how many fans want deals and how relatively few marketers are likely to be offering them, at least consistently, there must be an awful lot of disappointed social media users out there.

Pivot Conference have underlined their findings with this infographic, which takes a closer look at the perception gap between social consumers and social marketers

(Source: Pivot Conference. Marketing image via Shutterstock.)

Why do you follow a brand?

They asked, “Do you facebook?” I said no

They asked, “Do you Facebook?” I said no, (ok I fibbed, I am on it, I use it to stalk my wife, it saves having a conversation later) joke hunny!

They said this would be an eye opening webinar, that Facebook was a sales tool in disguise, that sales people could build better relationships, reach new clients and drive sales. I was intrigued because I and I will be honest, dislike Facebook. But as always, I was receptive to being converted, so I allocated an hour of my time to revisit and maybe discover this potential.

I wasn’t converted and for 24 hours I struggled to understand why. I understood the privacy settings, the creation of groups and how you can feed different messages to different parts of your network, I get that, much like Google+.

My conclusion was that it must be more than just one thing, so here are three.

1) The webinar was run by a marketer, (nothing wrong with that of course.) But the conversation revolved around demonstrations of what brands were doing. Not what or how an individual sales person could benefit.

2) I have yet to hear someone in a B2B environment say “hello C’suite, will you be my friend on Facebook?”. Even rephrasing it to “Join my network on Facebook” doesn’t sound right.

3) With other platforms that I use for business, engagement and relationship building cant I just have one place that is mine where I can relax, chill out and if I feel the need to just talk rubbish I can. Yes I know your can separate by using the groups, but it just means they’re in the room next door.

So here’s my question? Can I convince you, the sales person, that Facebook is not the place for connecting with your clients?

Twitter – Business Networking on Steroids!

(also written from a Brand perspective just to be fair)

Seventy nine percent of Twitter followers (versus 60 percent of Facebook fans) are more likely to recommend brands since becoming a fan or follower.
Sixty seven percent of Twitter followers (versus 51 percent of Facebook fans) are more likely to buy the brands they follow.
Facebook’s shared links average three clicks, while Twitter’s tweets generate nineteen clicks on average

Want more? Ok!

Twitter users generated double the median monthly leads of non-Twitter users.
Consumers active on Twitter are three times more likely to affect a brand’s online reputation through syndicated Tweets, blog posts, articles and product reviews.
Twenty percent of consumers indicate they have followed a brand on Twitter in order to interact with the company – more than e-mail subscribers or Facebook fans.

If that doesn’t sway you, then there is always LinkedIn – where it does feel right to say “Join my network of business professionals”

See my LinkedIn posts

Statistic credits to
http://www.businessinsider.com/twitter-destroys-facebook-2010-12
http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1007639
http://www.exacttarget.com/

Smoke Signals! – Are you listening to me?

If your on LinkedIn and regularly visit, you will be familiar with the home page and the stream of updates from your network. A great way of keeping in touch, listening, sharing and engaging where appropriate.

It is a great opportunity to share something that grabs your attention, with others and to say “Great article, thanks for sharing” or “Here is my opinion”. Not only does it notify your  network they also show in the poster’s network. Visibility to others is KEY.

Take this example today – an interesting debate on customer services from Rob Wilmot. I liked it and by doing so shared the article to my network. I also wrote a comment directly on the post.

Whilst my first degree connections are all interesting people, providing great content, I want to know what my second degree and sharing and posting. Did you know you can?

Pop into LinkedIn and go to Signal – you can find it under the heading of news. Now you have the chance to see those smoke signals that have always proved a challenge to get to.

You can even play around with the settings to pick out “seniority” or even “company”. You can save them for future perusal. So add your likes, your comments, get your self visible to people you want to get through to. Earn the right through social capital to have that coffee.

Do you currently use this? What success’s have you had? Did you know you could do this?

Social Retail – The Evolution

Currently one of many concerns for the retailer is getting the best product and the best price to its customer. Could the evolution of Social Retail develop a new relational model to offer clients valuable services together (recipes, nutritional info, personalized recommendations for dietary and much more) to bring a healthier and more comfortable life.

Learn more: HERE

 

Category: IBM, Retail

Unlocking value and productivity through social technologies

The social economy: Unlocking value and productivity through social technologie:

There’s plenty of research and comment around topics such as finding new customers, customer satisfaction, collaboration, building value, individual benefits from embracing Social technologies…    This report demonstrates that IBM is ahead of the curve for adoption (own use) and for solutions for firms embracing (for their use).

Key findings include :

The speed and scale of adoption of social technologies by consumers has exceeded that of previous technologies.
– Several distinct properties of social technologies make them uniquely powerful enablers of value creation. The most fundamental is to endow social interactions with the speed, scale, and economics of the Internet.
– Based on in-depth analysis of usage in sectors that represent almost 20 percent of global industry sales, we identify ten ways in which social technologies can create value across the value chain.
– Companies that rely heavily on consumer insights for product development and marketing purposes have an opportunity to create value by engaging with consumers on social media and monitoring social media conversations to generate consumer insights and market intelligence.
– Individuals and the communities they form will derive much of the benefits of social technologies.
– Giving social interactions Internet scale, speed, and economics carries risks. These risks include identity theft, loss of intellectual property, violations of privacy, abuse, and damage to reputations. Social technologies also can disrupt traditional business models.
– The benefits of social technologies will likely outweigh the risks for most companies.

Download the full report HERE

Mgi the social economy full report mckinsey from Ben Martin Social_Ben.
If you have any questions or want to explore the benefits of being a social business, contact me.