Search Results for: linkedin

LinkedIn Etiquette: Do’s and Don’ts [INFOGRAPHIC]

How good is your etiquette on LinkedIn?

This greast infographic by Top Dog Social Media gives you twenty do’es and don’ts!

Takeaways:

  • Profile Picture: Make sure you’ve got a profile picture, if you can, get a professional to do it.
  • Invitations: Personalise your message, every time.
  • Connect: Introduce your connections to others in your network.

LinkedIn Best Pratice

What are your take-aways or what would you add?

Category: LinkedIn

LinkedIn Endorsements Section becomes a whole lot better

I noticed yesterday when doing some LinkedIn fine tuning that we can now sort ALL of the skills we have listed under the endorsement section. Previously the top ten of your listed endorsements where sorted, top down, and we were unable to rearrange. The following forty however we could move as we saw fit.

What frustrated me, and many I speak to, is that we acquire new skills regularly and need these visible to help with our credibility. Not many of us will scroll and click to see the hidden skills.

This is a great change to the format and one that will help us all and highlight your new skills to those that view your profile. I agree, its not a perfect system, but neither the less its evolving in the right direction. Only downside, until someone endorses a skill you have moved it sits there with no validation. Could this have an adverse effect?

So take some time now and move your new skills you want your network to see and pay it forward, endorse someone. Though ONLY if you have experienced that skill. Or even better – write a recommendation for that person.

What do you think of the new Endorsements format? Drop a comment below

Category: LinkedIn

Uncover decision makers and influencers with LinkedIn Lead Recommendations

LinkedIn have released a function called “Lead Recommendations”.

Search for a contact or potential prospect and LinkedIn will help uncover decision makers and influencers at your target account. After searching the Lead Recommendation module will appear at the top, displaying other members who also work at that account

Lead Recommendations Ben Martin
LinkedIn make it easier to find the key prospects supervisors, peers and other decision-makers, influencers that may be critical to a successful close

Click to see additional recommendations

LinkedIn Leads
As the module appears at the top of all profiles at your target accounts, you can quickly navigate profiles to research whether that are a key decision maker or influencer.

To save time, you can add each profile of potential interest to your contacts. Then go back later and fully examine each profile  within your target account. When your ready to look at your saved profiles you can click the “See your saved leads at #”, which will appear once you have saved at least one profile. Or you can go directly to Contacts from the Network menus and select filter by Company, then type in your targets name.

When you have explored this new module, drop your thoughts below about it worked for you, hints and tips for others

How to master the art of LinkedIn rejections by Rob Wilmot

Rob Wilmot 

I often get asked about the etiquette of turning people down on LinkedIn; whether it’s a request for a connection, recommendation or introduction, it’s really important for your reputation that you deal with these situations correctly. In this article I share with you my own personal experience and the questions I’ve been asked along the way.

How to decide if you should accept an invitation to connect or not

Ask yourself:

  1. Do I know them well enough?
  2. Can I trust them? By accepting their invitation to connect you’ll normally be granting them access to view your immediate connections.
  3. Does the addition of this connection strengthen my network?
  4. Will this person know people that I would benefit from an introduction to?

If you’re answering yes to most of the above, then accept. If you have any no’s creeping in then perhaps you shouldn’t.                              

Dealing with the invites that you don’t want to accept

It’s OK to say no and it is actually a lot more polite and gracious than simply ignoring an invite. You should also remember that though it might not be the right time to connect now, things may change in the future. The best rejection I ever got was from someone I invited to connect after we had hooked up on Twitter. It went something like this…

“Hi Rob

I usually only accept invitations to connect from people I have already done business with or by introductions and recommendations from others in my network. However I look forward to reading your Tweets and getting to know you better that way.

Kindest regards

Bill”

I was pleased because Bill took the time to send a response and showed respect for our current relationship on Twitter, which continued to develop to the point where I eventually got an invitation to connect from him.

The point here is that if he had ignored my invitation to connect, it’s highly likely that I would have felt rejected and not continued our conversations on Twitter, and that would have been a big missed opportunity. It’s simple human psychology – we all like to feel valued and none of us like to be ignored.

How to decide if you should give a recommendation or not

People will request recommendations from you. The test here is: would you give them a reference offline for a job or for a tender?

Turning down a request for a recommendation

Don’t be afraid to turn down a request for recommendation, but do it kindly and with a positive attitude. My friend and top blogger Chris Brogan suggested that I use this approach…

“Hi _____

I’m honored you asked for a recommendation. Thanks for thinking of me. Because I haven’t worked enough with you professionally, I fear my recommendation wouldn’t be useful.

Rob”

Honesty really is the best policy, and when I’ve done this I’ve actually had messages back thanking me for taking the time to write. Being up-front like this creates a mutual respect, and strengthens relationships.

How to deal with requests to make an introduction

People will want to get to reach out to a connection of yours by using the LinkedIn introduction tool.  I try to help with introductions as often as possible as it creates trust and gratitude within my connections. But often you might not feel it’s appropriate to make an introduction. The test for this is simple:

Do you know the person asking for the introduction well enough to introduce them to your other connections? Can you vouch for them?

Your first instinct is usually the right one when deciding this.

Declining a request for an introduction

If you don’t feel comfortable making an introduction, for whatever reason, then don’t. Hit the decline button, but always decline politely. For example:

unfortunately, on this occasion, I don’t feel that I’m best placed to help with an introduction…”

Declining an introduction

You’ll no doubt at some point receive an introduction via someone in your immediate connections. The decision to accept is often clean cut, e.g. if someone is offering you a paid engagement or making/offering you a service that you definitely need. But sometimes you will receive an introduction regarding something that is just not a right fit for you.

If you’ve received an introduction but don’t want what they’re selling or are unable to help, don’t just ignore the introduction. Hit the decline button and write a polite note. For example:

“I’m sorry, but on this occasion, I don’t feel that I’m best placed to help you…”

Declining to make or accept introductions

It’s a respect thing; being courteous is just good manners. If someone asks you to make an introduction and there is a practical reason to decline, do so in a timely manner. If you don’t hit the decline button, you’re locking up one of the introductions from the quota of the person who’s asked for the introduction. Anyone with the free LinkedIn account can only make five introductions per year and so they are a valuable commodity, especially as outstanding introduction requests don’t expire for six months.

It’s over to you…

There is no rule book for managing your LinkedIn connections. As with networking face-to-face, try and treat people as you would wish to be treated yourself; be courteous and polite and people will value you all the more for it.

Add to the conversation – drop a comment below and say hi

Follow Rob on Twitter

Category: LinkedIn, Networking

Stand Out on LinkedIn with Rich Media

LinkedIn profiles can be so more than just a boring online version of your résumé.

Use LinkedIn profile like Coke, Ford and many others do: to promote themselves. Company websites and commercials contain customer testimonials, product demonstrations, and visual proof of their products. They use video, presentations and images to convey their message.

So can you! It just takes a little creativity…

What Media Can You Add?

LinkedIn now supports  images, video, audio, presentations and documents by certain providers listed here; others may work too. You have the choice to upload a file or use a URL if already published to the web.

These nifty media clips can be placed in various places in your profile. They can be part of your summary, incorporated into each position listed in your experience section, and in your education section. Just go to edit your profile and look for the little blue box. See image below.

LinkedIn Summary Ben Martin

What to Showcase?

Think about the problems or challenges of the audience you want to do business with. Does you company already have assets you can use, perhaps on YouTube  or perhaps they have material available on Slideshare. What value can you provide that differentiates you from the hundreds and thousands of other people who have the same job title as you?

LinkedIn is one of the first stops your client will make when they look you up. Why not go one step further and create you own original content. You can create a PowerPoint highlighting your knowledge or accomplishments and publish it to SlideShare. This is fairly simple to do. The most difficult part is figuring out what you will put into your PowerPoint presentation. Search around SlideShare and get ideas from other people who have created online content in your area of expertise. If you are interested in creating something a bit jazzier than PowerPoint, you may want to test Prezi.

Think of your profile as you window of credibility, what would you want someone to find if they were searching for you on the web?

Make your LinkedIn profile rock… with a media rich profile!

Has LinkedIn lost its way? The culling of value

LinkedIn has just notified its members via its help center, that LinkedIn Signal (recently renamed “Updates”) is to be sunset on the 29th LinkedIn Signal falls victimJuly. (Update 23/07 “Signal” or it’s latest name “Updates” is 100% being sunset)

To me this is yet another blow in using this tool to engage with like minded business professionals. If you do not know what Signal is, it provided a great way to listen for certain updates relating to keywords you where interested in. They could come from status updates, profile updates, group updates. In essence providing a great way to connect and reach out to another and have a conversation.

What else have we lost, all of the applications. I used the WordPress application, a lot.  They kept the events application for a while and then it was KIA. Answers was another great area to connect and build your expertise by helping others – KIA,

LinkedIn have been talking a lot about “Social Selling” and how their platform best suits this buzz word. So why oh why LinkedIn are you taking all the parts that suit, engagement, credibility and social selling, out.

 

Which element have you missed most as a result of the LinkedIn firing squad?

01/08 Update: A variation of the functions Signal offered will be available in LinkedIn’s Unified Search Engine – the date for this yet to be advised.

 

 

 

 

Category: LinkedIn

LinkedIn – Harness the Power – Reap the Rewards

LinkedIn is great for Business, or I should say SMART Business & SMART Networking

I am NOT a LinkedIn expert, but I do know how to make it work for me. Do you?

We are both equal in exposure and linking possibilities yet 96.5% of my LinkedIn connections are the result of people wanting to connect with me.

I do not accept everyone. But I do click on everyone’s profile before connection. Many are impressive. Most are average or less. Some are down right bad.emptyshop

How’s yours? A good friend of mine, James Potter better know as the @thelinkedinman has a short quiz you can take in two minutes, I suggest you do. Here is the link.
How many connections do you have? How are you communicating with your connections? How are your connections helping your sales or your career?

Your LinkedIn profile is just one, but perhaps the most important, social presence you have. You control exactly what it is. When others search for you on Google, LinkedIn is one of the first links they click on. You have a one time chance to make a positive impact, both personally and for business.

The Good: When I realised the business significance of LinkedIn, I immediately sought professional help to help me with the keywords, layout, and what to include on my profile page. So should you.

It must be working. In the three years since, my network has grown substantially, people wanting to connect with me, be part of my network, be my customer. Huge opportunity. At an acquisition cost of ZERO.

The Reality: I receive requests to link and I also get messages. Some are very nice, some are self-serving, some are insincere, and some are stupid (very stupid). And ALL messages are a reflection of the person sending them. That would be you.

Here are some THINGS about LinkedIn to make you think, re-think, and act:

• Your picture is NOT an option. Show a professional, but approachable, image. Be proud of who you are.
• Have a LinkedIn profile that gives me insight, not just history. Not just what you’ve done, but also who you are. Your profile is your pathway to connection.
DANGER: DO NOT USE stock LinkedIn messages. It shows your laziness, lack of creativity, and overall lack of professionalism. Standard LinkedIn messages need to be replaced with your own. EVERY TIME.
• Tell me WHY I should connect. (Where’s the value? Its reciprocal you know)
• If you’re looking for leads, use the keyword feature (rather than the job title option) in the “advanced search” link to the right of the search box. It’s free, and you’ll find hundreds of people in your industry or in your backyard that you never knew existed.
• If you’re asking me (or people) to join your group, TELL ME WHY I SHOULD.
• Allocate 30-60 minutes a day to utilize this vital business social media asset.

LinkedIn is the business social media site of today AND tomorrow. Harness its power, do not abuse its options, and you will reap its rewards.

By the way, If you’re hoping for an endorsement or a recommendation on LinkedIn, or anywhere – EARN IT!

Do you have examples of good or bad messages, drop some examples below (delete names for courtesy!)

LinkedIn Profile Blueprint – Your Digital Brand in the Social Landscape

 

How to start building the perfect LinkedIn Profile:

2013 LinkedIn Profile Character Limits

Knowing the space with which you can work in your LinkedIn profile is key to helping you build your perfect social brand! Here are your character limits:

  • Headline – 120 characters to fill with keywords, answer the question, “What do you do and the outcome you will provide?”
  • Summary – 2,000  characters to tell the story or YOU with keywords and  accomplishments. How have you helped others and their results they achieved from you.
  • Experience/Position Title – 100 characters to sum up your official experience in a title, or something more creative with keywords
  • Experience/Position Description – 2,000 characters to use keywords to sum up your role and your one to three key accomplishments. Make sure to format this area to make sure it is easy to read!
  • Skills & Expertise – 61 characters for the 50 skills you can list
  • Status updates – 700 characters for an unlimited times per day, however, I recommend only one or two per day. And you can include a hyperlink if you need more room!
  • Groups – 50 groups is your limit, so pick them wisely to show others with whom you are keeping company!
  • Education/Degree – 100 characters to explain your degree to include relevant keyword phrases
  • Education/Activities & Societies – 500 characters to give an overview that can tie into your career
  • Education Description – 1,000 characters to offer an overview of what you studied and how it is relevant to your career
  • Additional Info/Interests – 1,000 characters to further explain your background and show how interesting you really are!
  • Honors & Awards – 1,000 characters to shine the spotlight on YOU! Even if you won a sales award, it’s a great accomplishment to list!
  • Videos and Content – You are now able to add videos or other content such as pdf’s or powerpoints under several sections – Summary, Experience and Education. So get adding!

I would love to know if you have a tip or trick with the way you use LinkedIn! If you do, please comment. You can also follow me on Twitter @Social_Ben

Credit for content: MarketingThink.Com

Category: LinkedIn

Recruiting With Social Media — 35 Tips for LinkedIn, Twitter & Facebook

The thing I love about other people’s tips is that you invariably uncover ideas you’re not already implementing yourself. That’s why I wanted to share this new infographic with you. Whilst not agreeing with every single tip, the vast majority resonate as things I’ve seen successful social media recruiters incorporating into their social media strategies.
I was certainly intrigued to see that tweets with links front-loaded in the tweet outperform others. One to experiment with in the recruiting space perhaps? Whilst the suggestion to seed your blog posts in LinkedIn groups is one I would suggest should be done sparingly. Certainly this can drive relevant candidate traffic for recruiters, but it’s a fine line between being helpful and spammy in a LinkedIn group (and definitely avoid placing job advert links in the main discussion area of LinkedIn groups – that’s what the “jobs” tab is there for in each group, but often I see desperate recruiters cluttering up the discussion boards with misplaced adverts).
How about you? Which of these tips resonate as things that have worked for you? What other ideas would you add to the mix? Please feel free to comment below…

Category: Careers, Recruitment