Search Results for: linkedin

How To Search for Prospects on FaceBook, LinkedIn and Twitter [Infographic]

Believe or not, prospecting on social goes beyond just LinkedIn. The following infographic describes very easy ways to multiply your prospecting activity on Twitter and Facebook as well.

For instance, advanced search queries on Facebook, using queries like “pages liked by women who like Intel and live in New York”, can combine multiple variables, giving you targeted focus on and results.

LinkedIn’s Advanced Search feature allows you to identify decision makers and champions with complex filters through the use of Boolean search terms. You can then save your results as leads and export lists.

And Twitter’s search options help you find new customers fast. Search for key interest terms in tweets, people mentioned in tweets, places, and dates. Take a look:

 

advanced-search-cheat-sheet-infographic

Original Post

Category: Uncategorized

Some Amazing LinkedIn Statistics

LinkedIn is one of the older social networks, surviving changes in technology, a tough demographic and a number of challengers along the way.

Here is a collection of interesting LinkedIn statistics, I thought you might like:

 

Statistics

Total number of LinkedIn users : 414 million (December ’15)

Number of new members per second: 2.3 (December ’15)

Number of users in the U.S.: 107 million (February ’16)

Unique visitors monthly: 100 million

Reach of LinkedIn: 200 countries and territories

Users outside of the U.S.: 70%

A professional photo on your profile makes you 14 times more likely to be viewed

Number of Linkedin member page views in Q4 2015: 3.7 Billion

Percentage of Male users: 56% (April ’14)

Percentage of Female users: 44% (April ’14)

Average Female network (U.S.): 101

Average user time spent on LinkedIn, monthly: 17 minutes

Average network size of a CEO: 930

Most over used word in LinkedIn profiles: Motivated (2014)

Users that have listed volunteer experience and causes: 10 million

Percentage of millennials (15-34) that use LinkedIn: 13%

Most used adjective used in Linkedin profiles: Responsible (’13), Creative (’12), Creative (’11)

Percentage of users that use LinkedIn at least once a day: 40%

LinkedIn’s percentage of sharing;

Global: 4% (’13)

N America: 5% (’13)

European: 2% (’13)

Asian: 1% (’13)

Users in UK: 20 millions (’16)

Users in Middle East: 10 million (’13)

Users in Asia: 61 million (’14)

Users in India: 31 million (’15)

Users in Australia: 6 million (’14)

Users in China: 10 million (’15)

Total long form posts on LinkedIn: 3 million (’15)

Total long form posts generated weekly: 130,000

Percentage of millionaires that use LinkedIn: 41% (’14)

Number of new connections made on LinkedIn in the UK 2015: 338.7 million

UK’s most represented industry: IT & Services (’16)

 

Category: LinkedIn

How to figure out which LinkedIn Groups your buyers are part of? By Ankur Chaudhary

The best of social sellers leverage LinkedIn groups to their highest potential to develop relationships while generating warms leads for themselves.

However, often, we are not sure how to identify which LinkedIn groups our buyers are a part of. If you are using the LinkedIn advanced search option to build your buyers list, it is very easy to identify Groups your buyers are active in.

After filling in the criteria of your buyers, press ‘Search’ to go to a list of all your buyers.

When you scroll down the list, you will notice a ‘Group’ option. The groups mentioned here are the groups which have a maximum number of your buyers involved.

If you are targeting only a few companies, simply add all your target companies’ names in the ‘Current company’ box and tick any other search criteria required. LinkedIn will still tell you which of your buyers are part of which groups.


Your job is not done yet. A group with a higher number of your buyers might not be the ideal group for you chose to target your buyers.
You will need to check the Group statistics and see if this group might serve your purpose.

Important factors which you should note are:

– Comments over the last week (See below)

Go to demographics section to note the following factors (See image below):

– Seniority percentage

– Function

– Location

– Industry

Then go to activity section, which can be seen in the following image:

Give priority to ‘Number of comments’ than ‘discussions last week’ or ‘promotions last week’ to better judge the relevancy of a group. This information shows if the group is actively used by members to engage in discussions or if it is just a dump yard for promotions.

Here is a helpful post by Chris Makara on ‘6 ways to use LinkedIn groups for B2B Lead generation.’ http://chrismakara.com/social-media/6-ways-to-use-linkedin-groups-for-b2b-lead-generation/

I generated two warm leads in April by developing relationships in couple of groups I’m active in. How about you? I would love to hear some of your success stories.

Your LinkedIn Skills Just Got a Lot More Valuable by Donna Svei

While the Skills & Endorsements section on your LinkedIn profile has always helped your SEO, it just got a lot more valuable to you.


New Search Filter for LinkedIn Recruiter

Earlier this year, LinkedIn said it would add a Skills filter to its Recruiter product. The filter lets users search for LinkedIn members by the skills they have listed in the Skills & Endorsements sections of their profiles.

The filter looks like this:

I’ve now seen two reports from users that the filter is live, one from Irina Shamaeva here and another from Randy Bailey here.

More Member Value

If you have built out this section of your profile and you have endorsements, this new filter will make you more visible to thousands of recruiters. Good job!

Your Skills & Endorsements Strategy

  1. Look at your listed skills to be sure they include terms that recruiters would use to find someone like you.
  2. Use LinkedIn’s standard terminology when you can. For instance, I could use “resume writer” or “resume writing.” I chose “resume writing” because LinkedIn suggested it.
  3. Activate your ability to be endorsed and to endorse. At the bottom of your Skills & Endorsements section, click “Add skill.”That will take you to this screen where you can follow the red arrows:


Do Endorsements Matter for SEO?

We don’t know how much the number of endorsements you have matters for your SEO, but it’s a safe bet it’s in LinkedIn’s algorithm. As a recruiter, if I’m using the Skills filter, I would want to see people who have the most endorsements for a skill given some priority in my search results.

Isn’t It Nice?

I’m glad to see LinkedIn start to deliver more value from Skills & Endorsements. The Skills filter is an element of the company’s Economic Graph strategy and an incremental step forward in utility for everyone. I’m always happy when a little friction gets taken out of the job market!

I write executive resumes and LinkedIn profiles. Save time. Get hired. Email me at donnasvei@gmail.com or call me at (208) 721-0131.

Donna Svei, Executive Resume Writer

Category: LinkedIn

UK surpasses 20 million users on LinkedIn

This is a great infographic from one of my closest friends and a fountain of knowledge on all things LinkedIn.

Two thirds of the UK have a presence on LinkedIn, if you want to succeed in business, in this social era, you MUST utilise and effectively network on LinkedIn

Are you “using” it? Or are you just there?

LinkedIn UK Stats

Original Source: http://thelinkedinman.com/
https://uk.linkedin.com/in/thelinkedinman

This blog has been verified by Rise: dXGOPuDOaUsAGLSUGdnZhv7p4IFF7a4d

10 important changes you need to know about LinkedIn for 2015 by Greg Cooper

The LinkedIn development team have been busy. The last few months have seen many changes, big and small, to the world’s #1 business networking platform and the New Year will bring more. In this post I am going to highlight some of the ones I feel are most important for you to know about. You should be aware that because of the way that LinkedIn phases in updates gradually across its customer base it is likely that you will have some but not all of the changes mentioned below.

Why you may ask is it so important to keep up to date with changes to LinkedIn? Isn’t it at the end of the day just another business application like Word or Excel? Well no actually. LinkedIn is also the place where buyer and seller meet and build relationships. Studies consistently show that that the most successful sales people spend more time on LinkedIn than their less successful colleagues. Part of this time is spent making sure they keep abreast of changes because being fluent on LinkedIn gives you a competitive edge.

And so to the changes. Here in my opinion are some of the most important recent and planned changes you need to know about.

1. Revised pricing

LinkedIn recently revamped its pricing model, dumping the lower priced “Spotlight” and “Business” accounts and making “Business Plus” the entry level paid account. This represents a significant hike in pricing. Larger businesses and those selling high value products or services will still regard the paid account as good value however many small businesses are likely to balk at paying $49.95 per month.

If you are not sure if it is worth paying for a premium account LinkedIn has made it easy to upgrade, downgrade, or cancel anytime from your settings page. Here is acomparison of the different accounts. You can also try out any premium account for free for 30 days.

Here is an excellent article by Andy Brandt that reviews the recent price changes.

2. Profile Page – “View Page As” option

With the new profile page design you can “view page as” it will be seen by (a) your connections (b) by the public i.e.anyone. The latter is a stripped down version of your page which does not show blog posts, contact information, endorsements or recommendations, media files.

This is a useful reminder of the importance of reaching out to connect with your target audience so they have access to your profile page in its full glory!

Button allows you to see your profile as your connections or the public do

3. Permaedit Mode

Although the “edit profile” command remains at the moment in the drop down menu this is now redundant as scrolling over any section on the profile page will automatically turn on edit mode for that section – see below:

Scrolling over the profile page now instantly switches edit mode on

4. New look Homepage

LinkedIn have redesigned and simplified the homepage to become a personal dashboard.This is an update I don’t have at the time of writing. This is LinkedIn’s description of the main changes.

“At the very top of the homepage, your new dashboard gives you instant feedback on how you’re doing. See how many people have viewed you and understand how your status updates are performing. Click on either one to get deeper insights into what’s resonating with the connections you care about. Learn who found you – from that CEO to a long-lost friend – and how they found you, plus how you rank across your connections, within your company, and other LinkedIn members like you. Make quick edits to your profile – which help us surface better opportunities, news, and connection ideas for you – with a single click”.

There is also a new “Keep in touch box” at the top right of the page where you can share a comment, say congrats, or like an update.

Click here to read LinkedIn’s announcement about the redesigned homepage.

5. Redesigned recommendation feature

The recommendation feature is one of the longest established and most important LinkedIn features but until very recently had received little attention from the design team. I am glad to say the feature has now been completely updated, for example the rather bizarre option to send out up to 200 recommendations requests at once has been replaced by the option to send a maximum of three requests at one time.

6. Removal of group connection request

A couple of months ago LinkedIn quietly removed the ability to send connection invitations to people in a shared group. This was a very popular and useful feature. and many people are unhappy that this has disappeared. Being in the same group implies shared interests and would therefore seem a reasonable basis for connecting. If LinkedIn were concerned this feature was being abused it would have been simpler in my opinion to add an opt out in the settings menu.

7. New connection options

A change is coming to the standard connection request process from a member’s page. Currently clicking on the connect button on someone’s profile will bring up the dialogue box shown above. In future clicking on this button will automatically send a standard non-personalised connect request. In order to send a personalised request (recommended) it will be necessary to click on the drop down menu and select the customised request option.

I do not have this update yet.

8. How people found you

When you check who has viewed your profile LinkedIn now helpfully tells you how that person came to your profile e.g. from a group, the mobile app, the who viewed your profile page. Whilst this is not necessarily the most important recent change it does give useful feedback on which aspects of your LinkedIn activity are being effective in getting you noticed.

9. New Inmail policy

From January 2015 Inmails will work differently. Instead of receiving credits for Inmails that are not read the system will be turned on its head so in future you receive a credit for every response received (Reply or Not Interested) from a recipient within 90 days. If you don’t get a response within 90 days, however, the InMail credit will be lost.

The monthly Inmail allowance will also increase depending on your membership. For example the entry level Business Plus account will now receive 15 instead of 10 per month. Unused Inmails will continue to be valid for 90 days, after which they are deleted.

It is possible to purchase up to 10 additional Inmails.

Read the LinkedIn policy in full.

10. New LinkedIn search engine

Over the last 18 months LinkedIn has been developing and rolling out a new search engine code named “Galene”. This has largely replaced the original “Lucene” search engine which was no longer able to cope with the volume and rate of change of LinkedIn’s data.

The key benefits provided by the new search engine are:

  • Instant member search of whole LinkedIn database
  • Improved relevance as a result of a more sophisticated algorithm

This is a work in progress and some of the results that a LinkedIn search currently produces can be a bit puzzling with no obvious logic. However it does seem that some of the factors that will influence your ranking on a given search are location, social proximity (how closely connected you are to an individual), and keywords.

There are many more impenetrable criteria hidden in the bowels of the algorithm which we can only guess at, but as with Google search the best advice for users is to make sure you are posting good quality content that is relevant to your audience and you have written and optimised your profile with the customer in mind.

Stop press: LinkedIn have just announced that free account users will now be able to view full names and profiles for anyone in their extended network, this was previously only available to paid subscribers. At the same time LinkedIn are introducing a new restriction on the number of searches that free account users can make each month – this is know as the rather vaguely defined “commercial limit”.A progress bar will appear in your search results when 30% of your searches are left, and will continue to remind you in 5% increments. After you’ve reached the limit, you’ll continue to be able to search, but will see a limited number of results. Your free monthly usage will reset on the 1st of each calendar month.

You can read more here.

I’d love to hear what you think of these changes and any other changes which you feel will have a significant impact on the way you use LinkedIn.

If you have enjoyed this article please share it so other people can too.

_________________________________

Greg Cooper is a Marketing Coach and LinkedIn specialist and Google+ trainer based in Bristol, UK. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Direct Marketing. For over twenty years Greg ran an award winning direct marketing agency working with leading technology companies like IBM, SAP, and Siemens. Today he works with SMEs and Business Units of larger companies. He is an accredited coach on the Government sponsored Growth Accelerator Programme.

For more information about Greg’s Coaching and Training Services or to join the mailing list please click here.

LinkedIn Etiquette: Do’s and Don’ts [INFOGRAPHIC]

How good is your etiquette on LinkedIn?

This greast infographic by Top Dog Social Media gives you twenty do’es and don’ts!

Takeaways:

  • Profile Picture: Make sure you’ve got a profile picture, if you can, get a professional to do it.
  • Invitations: Personalise your message, every time.
  • Connect: Introduce your connections to others in your network.

LinkedIn Best Pratice

What are your take-aways or what would you add?

Category: LinkedIn

LinkedIn Endorsements Section becomes a whole lot better

I noticed yesterday when doing some LinkedIn fine tuning that we can now sort ALL of the skills we have listed under the endorsement section. Previously the top ten of your listed endorsements where sorted, top down, and we were unable to rearrange. The following forty however we could move as we saw fit.

What frustrated me, and many I speak to, is that we acquire new skills regularly and need these visible to help with our credibility. Not many of us will scroll and click to see the hidden skills.

This is a great change to the format and one that will help us all and highlight your new skills to those that view your profile. I agree, its not a perfect system, but neither the less its evolving in the right direction. Only downside, until someone endorses a skill you have moved it sits there with no validation. Could this have an adverse effect?

So take some time now and move your new skills you want your network to see and pay it forward, endorse someone. Though ONLY if you have experienced that skill. Or even better – write a recommendation for that person.

What do you think of the new Endorsements format? Drop a comment below

Category: LinkedIn

Uncover decision makers and influencers with LinkedIn Lead Recommendations

LinkedIn have released a function called “Lead Recommendations”.

Search for a contact or potential prospect and LinkedIn will help uncover decision makers and influencers at your target account. After searching the Lead Recommendation module will appear at the top, displaying other members who also work at that account

Lead Recommendations Ben Martin
LinkedIn make it easier to find the key prospects supervisors, peers and other decision-makers, influencers that may be critical to a successful close

Click to see additional recommendations

LinkedIn Leads
As the module appears at the top of all profiles at your target accounts, you can quickly navigate profiles to research whether that are a key decision maker or influencer.

To save time, you can add each profile of potential interest to your contacts. Then go back later and fully examine each profile  within your target account. When your ready to look at your saved profiles you can click the “See your saved leads at #”, which will appear once you have saved at least one profile. Or you can go directly to Contacts from the Network menus and select filter by Company, then type in your targets name.

When you have explored this new module, drop your thoughts below about it worked for you, hints and tips for others

How to master the art of LinkedIn rejections by Rob Wilmot

Rob Wilmot 

I often get asked about the etiquette of turning people down on LinkedIn; whether it’s a request for a connection, recommendation or introduction, it’s really important for your reputation that you deal with these situations correctly. In this article I share with you my own personal experience and the questions I’ve been asked along the way.

How to decide if you should accept an invitation to connect or not

Ask yourself:

  1. Do I know them well enough?
  2. Can I trust them? By accepting their invitation to connect you’ll normally be granting them access to view your immediate connections.
  3. Does the addition of this connection strengthen my network?
  4. Will this person know people that I would benefit from an introduction to?

If you’re answering yes to most of the above, then accept. If you have any no’s creeping in then perhaps you shouldn’t.                              

Dealing with the invites that you don’t want to accept

It’s OK to say no and it is actually a lot more polite and gracious than simply ignoring an invite. You should also remember that though it might not be the right time to connect now, things may change in the future. The best rejection I ever got was from someone I invited to connect after we had hooked up on Twitter. It went something like this…

“Hi Rob

I usually only accept invitations to connect from people I have already done business with or by introductions and recommendations from others in my network. However I look forward to reading your Tweets and getting to know you better that way.

Kindest regards

Bill”

I was pleased because Bill took the time to send a response and showed respect for our current relationship on Twitter, which continued to develop to the point where I eventually got an invitation to connect from him.

The point here is that if he had ignored my invitation to connect, it’s highly likely that I would have felt rejected and not continued our conversations on Twitter, and that would have been a big missed opportunity. It’s simple human psychology – we all like to feel valued and none of us like to be ignored.

How to decide if you should give a recommendation or not

People will request recommendations from you. The test here is: would you give them a reference offline for a job or for a tender?

Turning down a request for a recommendation

Don’t be afraid to turn down a request for recommendation, but do it kindly and with a positive attitude. My friend and top blogger Chris Brogan suggested that I use this approach…

“Hi _____

I’m honored you asked for a recommendation. Thanks for thinking of me. Because I haven’t worked enough with you professionally, I fear my recommendation wouldn’t be useful.

Rob”

Honesty really is the best policy, and when I’ve done this I’ve actually had messages back thanking me for taking the time to write. Being up-front like this creates a mutual respect, and strengthens relationships.

How to deal with requests to make an introduction

People will want to get to reach out to a connection of yours by using the LinkedIn introduction tool.  I try to help with introductions as often as possible as it creates trust and gratitude within my connections. But often you might not feel it’s appropriate to make an introduction. The test for this is simple:

Do you know the person asking for the introduction well enough to introduce them to your other connections? Can you vouch for them?

Your first instinct is usually the right one when deciding this.

Declining a request for an introduction

If you don’t feel comfortable making an introduction, for whatever reason, then don’t. Hit the decline button, but always decline politely. For example:

unfortunately, on this occasion, I don’t feel that I’m best placed to help with an introduction…”

Declining an introduction

You’ll no doubt at some point receive an introduction via someone in your immediate connections. The decision to accept is often clean cut, e.g. if someone is offering you a paid engagement or making/offering you a service that you definitely need. But sometimes you will receive an introduction regarding something that is just not a right fit for you.

If you’ve received an introduction but don’t want what they’re selling or are unable to help, don’t just ignore the introduction. Hit the decline button and write a polite note. For example:

“I’m sorry, but on this occasion, I don’t feel that I’m best placed to help you…”

Declining to make or accept introductions

It’s a respect thing; being courteous is just good manners. If someone asks you to make an introduction and there is a practical reason to decline, do so in a timely manner. If you don’t hit the decline button, you’re locking up one of the introductions from the quota of the person who’s asked for the introduction. Anyone with the free LinkedIn account can only make five introductions per year and so they are a valuable commodity, especially as outstanding introduction requests don’t expire for six months.

It’s over to you…

There is no rule book for managing your LinkedIn connections. As with networking face-to-face, try and treat people as you would wish to be treated yourself; be courteous and polite and people will value you all the more for it.

Add to the conversation – drop a comment below and say hi

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Category: LinkedIn, Networking